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Chapter 1: Salix alba var. Caerulea

Chapter 2: Watermark Disease

Chapter 3: Why English Willow

Chapter 4: Grading Willow

Chapter 5: Butterfly Willow

Chapter 6: Grain Structure & Willow Colour

Chapter 7: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 8: Laver & Wood’s Guide to Cricket Bat

Chapter 9: Laver & Wood’s Handles

Chapter 10: Handle Breakage

Chapter 11: Revised Handle Laws

Chapter 12: Handle Manufacture

Chapter 13: The Coefficient of Restitution and Centre of Percussion – What are these?

Chapter 14: Importance of Pressing Cricket Bat Willow

Chapter 15: Traditional Bat Making

Chapter 16: Tools used in Traditional Batmaking I

Chapter 17: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 18: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 19: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 20: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 20: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 21: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 22: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 23: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 24: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 25: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 26: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 27: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 28: Testing a Cleft

Chapter 1:

Salix alba var. Caerulea

 

 

The Laws of Cricket state that the cricket bat blade has to be made of wood. The stipulation that the blade should be made of wood came about when the Australian player Dennis Lillee used an Aluminium bat in a test match against England in Australia in 1979. After only a few deliveries Mike Brearley complained that the bat was damaging the ball and the umpires instructed Lillee to replace it. Lillee declared that it was “the thing of the future”, however the cricketing world agreed that it “just wasn’t cricket” and soon after, the M.C.C. amended law 6.

Within the laws of cricket there is no restriction on the type of wood that should be used. Many timbers have been experimented with, but Salix alba var. Caerulea has been found the most suitable. Salix alba has the common name of White Willow, with the specific var. Caerulea commonly known as Cricket Bat Willow.

Cricket Bat Willow grows well throughout the world, but for cricket bat making purposes, the British climatic conditions are best. The British climate is perfect for growing cricket bat willow, not too hot in the summer, not too cold in the winter, with an ideal rainfall, combined with favourable soil types.

To find out more about Salix alba var. Caerulea please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 2: Strategy

 

Since the beginning of the twentieth century the cricket bat willow, Salix alba Caerulea, has been subject to a serious infectious bacterial disease, Watermark Disease. Watermark Disease results in the crown of the tree dying back, but rarely brings the death of an entire tree. This infection is known as watermark disease because affected wood has a dark watery stain.

Trees of any age are liable to infection, but those under five years of age seldom show any signs of attack. The disease is easy to recognise by the stain in the wood, but the external symptoms are sometimes confused with those of the honey fungus, Armillaria mellea, which slowly kills the tree without staining the wood, and with die back due to various causes including drought or bad drainage.

Trees infected by Watermark disease present with certain visible symptoms. In England the first signs that a tree has the disease is in about the third or fourth week in April and into early May. The first leaves, which by then have appeared, lose their grey colour, wither and turn reddish.

To find out more about Watermark Disease please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 3: Why English Willow

 

 

English cricket bat willow is regarded by batmakers world wide to be the highest quality. The growing conditions in England allow Salix alba var. Caerulea to grow at the ideal rate, especially in the warm, wet summers, which means the wood remains dense.

Dense willow provides the best balance of performance and durability. Willow that grows too fast does not have both performance and durability as the wood does not have the required density for making the best cricket bats. Fast growing willow does not have the performance or durability sought by cricket bat makers.

Graded Clefts
Cricket Bat Willow grows all over the world. Unfortunately only willow growing in England has the right climatic conditions and soil types to produce willow able to be used for high grade cricket bats.

To find out more about why Laver & Wood uses only English Willow please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 4: Grading Willow

Making a good bat begins with grading the willow. Grading willow is not an exact science. It is more a craft that is developed over time, where an intuitive feel for what a cleft can become is as important as any specific measurements.

At Laver & Wood we grade each piece of willow at least four times before it is turned into a bat. This is a time consuming process, but crucial to getting the best performance out of an individual cleft.

All Laver & Wood’s willow comes from JS Wright & Sons in Essex. Wrights are recognised as one of the top, if not the top, willow merchants in the world. Wrights send us a variety of grades, and make sure that all bat makers take a range of willow from several different grades. Wrights enforce very sensible purchasing rules making bat makers purchase a range of grades, rather than just the top of the line willow.

To find out more about why Laver & Wood grades our willow please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 5: Butterfly Willow

 

 

Making a good bat begins with grading the willow. Grading willow is not an exact science. It is more a craft that is developed over time, where an intuitive feel for what a cleft can become is as important as any specific measurements.

At Laver & Wood we grade each piece of willow at least four times before it is turned into a bat. This is a time consuming process, but crucial to getting the best performance out of an individual cleft.

All Laver & Wood’s willow comes from JS Wright & Sons in Essex. Wrights are recognised as one of the top, if not the top, willow merchants in the world. Wrights send us a variety of grades, and make sure that all bat makers take a range of willow from several different grades. Wrights enforce very sensible purchasing rules making bat makers purchase a range of grades, rather than just the top of the line willow.

To find out more about why Laver & Wood grades our willow please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 6: Grain Structure & Willow Colour

 

 

One of the most common questions asked by cricketers is how different grains perform in cricket bats. There are a number of different factors to consider when discussing grains, and there are no absolutely right answers. The natural variation in willow means that there are rules, rather than hard laws, about grains in bats.

The number of grains affects the grade of the willow, and affects the look of the bat. From a bat makers perspective we like to get a balance between performance and durability. There is often, but not always, a trade off between the performance of the bat and its durability.

Some players will have had bats with a large number of grains that have performed better than any other bat they have used, so they want to stay with blades with a large number of grains. Others will have been disappointed that their tightly grained bat did not last very long, and prefer to go for a more conventional seven to nine grains. Batsmen of the calibre of Viv Richards and Sunil Gavaskar favoured bats with few grains, so a lot of the decisions about the number of grains ultimately comes down to personal preference.

To find out more about grains structure and willow colour and how these affect the performance of your bat please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 7: Testing a Cleft

 

 

Part of the craft of hand making bats is understanding the type of bat each individual cleft is capable of becoming. A good bat maker can turn an average cleft into a bat that performs well, and a good cleft into a bat that is absolutely stunning.

Each cleft has inherent qualities, the two most important being density and weight. Bats that are very dense will not perform well, while bats that are not very dense may not be particularly durable.

Weight can be reduced by drying the cleft, though the batmaker has to be careful not to over dry the cleft or some of the strength of the willow will be reduced. Clefts that are over dry will be light, and will perform exceptionally well, but will not last.

To find out more about how James & Toby test clefts please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 8: Laver & Wood’s Guide to Cricket Bat

 

 

Cricket bats were originally made out of a single piece of wood. This meant there was no shock attenuation when the bat struck the ball. The bat would have jarred in the hands of the batsman every time they hit the ball.

To overcome this problem bats were made out of two pieces of timber, usually just another piece of willow spliced into the handle. In the 1850’s there was another evolution to the handle, with cane, usually Manau Cane, being introduced in 1853. This subsequently improved the balance of the bat but still did not adequately attenuate the shock.

Three years later, in 1856, handles took the form they have maintained until now. Canes were split and then laminated back together with rubber between the canes. The rubber helped dampen down the shock of the ball hitting the bat. This dealt with the jarring, and the 1850s technology has stood the test of time.

To find out more about handles please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 9: Laver & Wood’s Handles

Laver & Wood use handles that are not too dissimilar to those used in the 1850s. We source our cane from South East Asia, and have experimented with making our own handles, although we also purchase handles in their most basic form.

When handles arrive they will be about half to twice as thick as the finished handle. The first stage of the manufacturing process is to turn the handles on a lathe, to reduce them down to close to the width required to go into a bat.

The next stage is to cut the splice. This cut needs to be carefully made so the join between the handle and the blade there is a very tight fit. After applying glue the splice is tapped in with a knocking in mallet.

To find out more about Laver & Wood’s handles and James’ favourite handle designs please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 10: Handle Breakage

Handles & the splice of the bat are one of the major break points in a bat. Careful craftsmanship can extend the life of handles. At Laver & Wood we are absolutely pedantic about how we make our handles, as we can dramatically reduce the chance of the handle breaking or the splice coming apart.

There are many weak points in handles and through making our own bats and repairing other brands’ bats we have gathered a very good idea of why handles break.

The most common weak point on a handle is the join where the rubber strips are glued to the cane in the centre of the handle. Often the canes delaminate causing the handle to become very flexible. This is almost impossible to spot when buying a bat, but in general, thicker handles last better than thin handles, so it is best to avoid bats with thin handles.

To find out more about why Laver & Wood uses only English Willow please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 11: Revised Handle Laws

In the middle part of the first decade of this century batmakers began innovating with handle designs. This was driven partly by a shortage in high grade cane for handles, as well as a desire to create a point of difference with other bat makers though innovation.

C-10 handle insert.

At the same time concerns that the bat was dominating the ball were troubling the cricketing community. Stiffer handles can increase the distance the ball travels as the give in the rubber and cane handle means that it does not deliver as much power as a stiffer handle will.

Carbon fibre inserts in the handle were used to stiffen up the handle. Our experiments showed that our stiffer handles gave the batsman a huge advantage, being able to hit the ball far further than with a bat with a conventional handle.

To find out more about handles please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 12: Handle Manufacture

Cricket bat handles have been manufactured in the same manner for over 150 years. The process, from the time of harvest, may have become a little more mechanised over the years, but is still essentially the same as it was in the 1850s.

James’ preferred splice & handle configuration, with high shoulders supporting the handle.

Fumigation

Fumigation, using Sulphur fumes brings out the best of the canes’ colour at the same time as killing any borer. After the canes are washed, they are fumigated in a chamber with an external container burning the Sulphur. The fumes are carried into the chamber by a flue, and the canes are smoked overnight, or for up to 24 hours until an even colour is obtained.

Once fumigated the canes are air dried and sorted into different grades.

To find out more about handle manufacturing please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 13: The Coefficient of Restitution and Centre of Percussion – What are these?

Before becoming a bat maker James trained as a Construction Engineer. He has attempted to explain some engineering principles as they apply to cricket bats.

The performance of a cricket bat is dictated by the physical properties of both the bat & ball, where the bat connects with the ball, and the relative velocities of both on impact. The measurement of the result of the collision between the bat and ball is known as the “Coefficient of Restitution”.

The Coefficient of Restitution is a simple relationship between the velocity of a ball just before impact dropped onto a solid surface and the resulting velocity immediately after impact. Measuring the Coefficient of Restitution allows a bat maker to make decisions about a particular cleft based on hard data, rather than intuitive feel.

To find out more about the underlying theory of cricket bat performance please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

Chapter 14: Importance of Pressing Cricket Bat Willow

The game of cricket involves a bat that is made of a soft material and a ball made of a hard material. The ball, although hard on the outside, is designed to change shape slightly on impact thus minimising any potential damage to the bat. The bat is designed to withstand the pressure of the hard surface of the new ball.

Pressing is important for two reasons. Without pressing the willow absorbs the velocity of the ball, rather than transference of the energy back to the ball. The hard surface created by pressing also protects the bat from damage. A key part of the batmakers’ craft is getting the right balance between pressing too softly and having a bat that lacks durability, and pressing too hard so its performance is killed.

Bats pressed and shoulders cut out.

Cricket bats have been pressed since the early 1800’s. Prior to shaping and balancing, the piece of willow was subjected to a huge amount of pressure by striking the surface of the willow with a heavy mallet. Pressing in this manner resulted in a very hard layer of compressed willow that made the bat very resilient to wear and tear. The only problem with this method was that the bat was very often too hard and did not perform.

To find out more about how Laver & Wood press cricket bat willow please purchase Laver & Wood’s Cricket Bat Lore Volume I from Amazon.

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